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New Safety Harnesses
Tuesday, December 22nd, 2009

New Safety Harnesses

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My first experience with a safety harness was not a “Harness” at all but a black nylon strap that I wrapped around my waist and attached to the tree.  During my younger days, I didn’t give much thought to this method of “security” in the treestand.  I simply thought that since I had something on, I was good to go.  Thankfully I never had to test that theory out but have since learned a great deal more about treestand safety and the risks that are involved without a good harness…..yeah, that’s right, a real HARNESS, not just a strap! 

 

This season, we tried out 3 new Safety Harnesses.  The Rescue One CDS Harness from Mountaineer Sports and 2 new harnesses from TrophyLine USA (The Extreme Vest and the Armourlite Harness).  Here’s a look at these harnesses and what they have to offer:

 

The Rescue One CDS: 

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The “CDS” stands for “Controlled Descent System” and it’s the only harness that we know of that can lower you safely to the ground in the case of a tree-stand mishap.   This harness is very light and is constructed of high quality materials to ensure strength and comfort.  The specs on the Rescue One are as follows:

  • Easy to use Descent System allows safe, controlled descent to ground from up to 30 feet.
  • Super strong, lightweight Harness System with Legs, Waist and Chest Straps is easy to put on, easy to adjust. Weighs 6 pounds.
  • Low profile, metal dual lock safety buckles on leg straps, flat buckles for waist and chest straps.
  • Comfortable, breathable nylon webbing/straps.
  • Easily repacked for reuse.
  • Easily installs on any tree.
  • The unique ‘CDS’ Rack is made from high strength aluminum alloy with a 40,000 pound tensile strength rating. It ensures a safe stop if you fall and then a safe descent if needed.
  • State-of-the-art, water resistant, dynamic shock absorbing line lessens shock should a fall occur producing less shock force to the body than standard Harness Systems.
  • Line will not tangle on deployment.
  • Retains user in upright position after a fall.
  • Includes a Treestand Anchor Strap and Carabineer which is used to attach the Harness Tether Line Loop to the tree.
  • Includes a Lineman’s Safety Rope with Prussic Knot and two Carabineers. The Safety Rope is to be placed around the tree and attached to each Lineman’s Loop of the harness for stability when climbing up or down a tree and when putting up or taking down your stand.
  • A Reserve Suspension Relief Strap (RSRS) is built in to provide the user a foot loop in which to stand up in to relieve the pressure on the inside of the legs for improved blood circulation. Unlike other harness systems that must be retrieved from a compartment in the harness and then attached, running the risk of dropping it, our Reserve Suspension Relief Strap is already attached. Dropping the RSRS during an emergency could prove fatal in others, our system eliminates this possibility. May also be used as a deer drag.
  • Comes with an Interchangeable Back Cover in Realtree AP HD, Mossy Oak Treestand, ASAT camo or Blaze Orange. Separate Interchangeable Back Covers let you go from your favorite camo for bow season to blaze orange for firearm season.
  • Sizing:Standard size fits Most M/L/XL                                                                          
  • MAXIMUM WEIGHT: 300 lbs.

Colors Available include: ASAT, Realtree AP, Mossy Oak, and Blaze Orange

Check it out at www.mountaineer-sports.com

 

Our Thoughts on This Harness: We were surprised as to how light this harness was.  Everything worked flawlessly during our testing / hunts with this harness and the instructions for “recoil” of the descent rope was easy to follow as well.  Our only issue with this harness was the excess bulk that the coiled descent rope creates on the back of the harness.  We weren’t able to lean flush against many of the trees we had stands in but after a few hunts, we got used to it.  Honestly, this probably helped our posture! It’s really a give and take situation.  You’ll get the ability to lower yourself to the ground with this harness but it may cause you an inability to sit with your back flush against the tree.  At $149.99, this vest falls in the average range of high quality safety harnesses and is the only harness on the market to give you the descent feature.  Ask your local sporting goods retailer about the Rescue One CDS.

 

TrophyLine USA:

This year, TrophyLine came out with 2 new styles of safety harnesses based on your preference.  TrophyLine brought us the Tree Saddle and is now entering the safety harness market.  The vest style is called the Gadget Extreme that offers, as the name suggests, an unbelievable amount of opportunities to connect and store your hunting gadgets.  The other style is more of a traditional harness called the ArmourLite.  Both of these style harnesses feature a “seat” type support to take the stress off of your groin area in the case of a fall.  They also offer a “Decelerator Pack” to cushion your fall should you experience one.  Here are the specs on each of these harnesses:

The Gadget Extreme Vest:

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PRODUCT DESCRIPTION:
Body Armourâ„¢ – Gadget Extremeâ„¢ This Superior Functional version of Body Armourâ„¢ works great for colder climates.

Sizes: M – 90 to 150 lbs  |  L/XL – 150 to 300 lbs

FEATURES:

• REALTREE® APG
• Gadget Retractor with clip, built into the shoulder:

-         Keeps your range finder or grunt call at your fingertips, so it’s there when you need it.
– Keeps items safely out of the way while shooting.

• 2 Gadget Gear Bands:

-         With rubberized grip, these gear bands quietly stretch around and hold call cans, cell phones, or other items in place.

• 9 Gadget Pockets:

-         2 Fleece hand warmer pockets
2 Standard pockets on the bottom front edges
2 Ergonomically designed pockets for cross access allowing minimal movement. These pockets are especially deep (to the bottom of the vest) and are tricked out with gear loops inside for ammo, calls, etc.
2 Inner roomy pockets allow QUIET access to the full length of the vest front
1 Deep, gusseted pocket on the back of the vest used for storage. It‘s a great location to place an optional hydration bladder, for long duration hunting

• 2 Bowstring rests used in conjunction with a removable Bow Cam Cradle
• Zero dB Ultra-Quiet Fabrics and Construction:

- Eliminates noise for quiet movement
– Creates a Body Conforming Streamline fit

• Shoulder, waist, and leg straps combined with Suspension Relief Seat:

-         Designed with cushioned neoprene for added comfort.

-         The Suspension Relief Seat (S.R.S.) is built right into the harness. After falling, you’ll have the SRS already positioned. Just let out some tension in the leg straps and you’re sitting more comfortably on the SRS. This minimizes the risk of suspension trauma caused by pressure on your femoral artery, an inherent danger of conventional harnesses.

• Decelerator Pack:

-         Allows for a controlled stop during a fall.

-         The Decelerator Pack which softens the fall (if you should have one), causing you to hit bottom with almost half the force as you would with other harnesses.

Reusable Mesh Bag containing: 

1 Safety DVD
1 Removable Bow Cam Cradle
1 Tree Belt 1 Instruction Sheet

Safety Assist Strap (OPTIONAL ITEM available for purchase)
7’ long Climbing Belt – It is highly recommended to add this option to stay secure as you ascend and descend. The climbing belt may be used for added suspension relief, giving you another option in the event of a fall.

 The ArmourLite Harness:

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This lightweight version of Body Armourâ„¢ is great for warm climates or under jackets. This style harness is basically the same as the Extreme Vest except without the pockets!

Sizes: M – 90 to 150 lbs  |  L/XL – 150 to 300 lbs

FEATURES:

• REALTREE® APG
• Gadget Retractor with clip, built into the shoulder:

-         Keeps your range finder or grunt call at your fingertips, so it’s there when you need it.
– Keeps items safely out of the way while shooting.

• AirFlow Cushion Mesh Inside:                                                                                     - Allows air to flow between the harness and your body.

• Realtree APG Water Resistant Fabric Shell
• Adjustable Elastic Chest Strap
• Zero dB Ultra-Quiet Fabrics and Construction:                                                               - Eliminates noise for quiet movement

• Shoulder, waist, and leg straps combined with Suspension Relief Seat:

-         Designed with cushioned neoprene for added comfort.

-         The Suspension Relief Seat (S.R.S.) is built right into the harness. After falling, you’ll have the SRS already positioned. Just let out some tension in the leg straps and you’re sitting more comfortably on the SRS. This minimizes the risk of suspension trauma caused by pressure on your femoral artery, an inherent danger of conventional harnesses.

• Decelerator Pack:

-         Allows for a controlled stop during a fall.

-         The Decelerator Pack which softens the fall (if you should have one), causing you to hit bottom with almost half the force as you would with other harnesses.

Reusable Mesh Bag  containing:                                                                                                

1 Safety DVD
1 Removable Bow Cam Cradle
1 Tree Belt 1 Instruction Sheet

Safety Assist Strap (OPTIONAL ITEM available for purchase)
7’ long Climbing Belt – It is highly recommended to add this option to stay secure as you ascend and descend. The climbing belt may be used for added suspension relief, giving you another option in the event of a fall.

Our Thoughts on these two harnesses: We like the fact that TrophyLine offers two styles depending on your preference for a vest style or a lighter type harness.  These are a little more “involved”, shall we say, meaning that there’s a lot going on with these harnesses.  Cords, pockets, hooks, straps, you name it, these harnesses have it!  The length of the leg straps are plenty long.  TrophyLine provides a little Velcro strap to coil the excess length of the leg straps but we still thought that this much strap material was a tad unnecessary.  Overall, these harnesses are extremely well thought out and made of high quality material.  At $169.99 and $119.99 respectively, the Gadget Extreme Vest and ArmourLite Harness also fall into the average price range for high quality safety harnesses.  They’re worth a look at your local sporting goods store!

Check them out at www.trophylineusa.com

 

 

One of our requirements for harnesses is that they be easy to put on and not get tangled up.  All of these safety harnesses met that requirement and then some and the quality of construction was second to none on all these models.  

 

Safety Harnesses have come a long way since the days of the simple nylon strap.  You owe it to yourself to check out the various styles of harnesses offered on the market today and decide on one for use each time you climb into your stand. 

News Flash! Hunting Involves Killing
Tuesday, December 15th, 2009

 News Flash!  Hunting Involves Killing
By Bob Peck, December 13, 2009

“That’s it?!”  I said completely incredulous.  “The only part of the deer you eat is the tenderloins?” 

I could tell he’d been there before with other hunters like me and was prepared for this question.  He took what had to be a full minute before he responded. His eyes were turned downward.  He studied the tops of his boots.  He took a few deep breaths and then looked me square in the eyes without blinking once to create a dramatic moment.  “My belief is man is a predator.  Man has always been a predator and always will be.  We can dress it up and say we’re hunters.  We can use words like “harvest” and “cull” but what we are is killers.  We are predators just as surely as a coyote or a wolf.  We live in modern villages and we talk all about political correctness and heady topics like Democrat vs Republican, global warming  and world economies but when get geared up and go into their zone something happens to our brains that is a base human instinct we haven’t completely left behind.  We head out to kill.” 

Long pause …. “And when we do kill we have to depersonalize what we’re doing.   A predator doesn’t rationalize and if we did at the moment of truth nothing would get killed.  Face it.  None of us really needs that meat to survive like primitive man so why do we hunt if not to satisfy an ancient predatory instinct not extinquished?”

I’d never thought about it this way.  Seemed a crude perspective but I’ve always been adverse to sugar coating anything and my good friend Bob Foulkrod used to always say “We harvest wheat.  We don’t harvest animals.  We kill them.”  There is a certain obvious logic here but yet many hunters get upset at the bluntness.  They will rightfully and earnestly say things like:

“There is more to hunting than killing.” 

“It’s not about killing, it’s about the challenge of figuring things out.” 

“It’s about passing on the heritage not about killing innocent animals.”

“I rely on the meat to carry my family.”

Since I have been into setting up, fund raising and supporting venison donation programs in NY, MI and now VA I just had to ask …. “What do you do with the rest of the meat?”  The response was immediate “I don’t take the time to bother with it.  After I remove the tenderloins and the butterfly tenderloins inside I toss the whole carcass.”  That’s it.  He “tosses” the whole carcass.  No pelt to turn into deer skin gloves, no use of the “parts” for use by food manufacturers, no venison donation.  I just met a hunter who only hunts whitetail deer for the tenderloins.

O.K so I calmed myself and then needed much more information.  “How do you reconcile this?”  He looked completely puzzled.  “Reconcile?  What is there to reconcile?”  I was as puzzled by him being puzzled.  I thought it was a pretty straight forward question.  I tried again.  “I’m asking you if you feel bad at wasting the animal?”  He laughed.  “Hell no.  I’m a predator and this is what predators do.  We kill. We take what we want and we leave the rest.  Besides, I like to hunt other predators like coyotes so I dump the carcass in places where I want to shoot other predators.”  Wow.  This was getting interesting.

“O.K and after you shoot the coyote what do you do with the animal?”  I got a “you dummy, that’s obvious” look.  The answer was slow in coming … “I sell the pelt of course.  I can get $50 from a taxidermist I know.”
Next question …  “Did you ever think about venison donation?”  No.
Next question … “What do you do if you shoot a nice buck?”  Saw off the antlers or have it mounted.

Next question … “Don’t you catch a lot of crap from other hunters on this?”  Yeah but I’m a predator and predators kill first and NEVER ask questions later. Besides, predators don’t care what other predators think. 

Next question … “Does the word stewardship of the land and resources ever enter into your vocabulary?”  No.  Predators don’t plant food plots, cut down trees and concern themselves with resources.  If I have a craving for some venison tenderloin I go get it.”

Last question … “If you could buy venison tenderloin in your local supermarket meat counter would you?” 

How do you feel?

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News Flash!  Hunting Involves Killing –Part 2
By Bob Peck, January20, 2010

A night vision monocular takes some getting used to but once your brain and eyes get used to the experience it’s pretty cool.  You get to see a side to the deer woods most will never experience and yes, it’s almost exactly like daylight with the exception of the greenish glow that surrounds the images you see.  We were perched on a ridge looking down into a food plot full of deer a full 170 yards away.  I’d estimate 50-60 deer were browsing peacefully in what appeared to be a five acre plot.  I rotated the monocular up and away from my face and flipped open my cell phone.  Wow.  2:30 a.m.!  Way past my bedtime but I wouldn’t have missed this experience for anything.

With the monocular back in place and a few minutes to readjust we were back to some spectacular night time viewing.  I say we, because my guide was the Predator I mentioned in the first part of this story.  I heard the Predator whisper into his radio via the throat microphone “Delta T, you copy?”  I couldn’t hear the response if there was one but silently and with deliberate motion the Predator swept his hand towards an adjacent ridge.  “Roger that.” He hushed as his arm made an arc.

In a matter of a few seconds I began to see pops of light on the ridge evenly spaced.  No sound. Just little pops of light like a camera flashbulb at considerable distance. At first I thought I was seeing strobes or the headlamps from hunters moving about.  I learned later what I was seeing was the muzzle flash from two different sharp shooter teams with silencers taking aim on the herd I was admiring a few minutes earlier.  The teams were set up like military sniper teams, one shooter, one spotter.

The Predator physically grabbed me by my shoulders so I was looking back to the food plot.  Like sacks of flour hitting a loading dock one deer after the other dropped straight down into a lifeless heap. The other deer took notice but in between intervals of muzzle flashes they slowly moved without exhibiting much fear.   “They think the does are bedding down.” was all I heard in my ear.  “Bedding down?!”  I stuttered in my best tree stand whisper.  “Yeah, when you shoot them in the head just right they fall straight down.  With a little practice you can usually get at least 20 killed with two teams shooting.” 

This was all new to me.  I was attending a completely legal culling exercise on a massive scale which I was definitely not mentally prepared for.  I thought one thing when I was invited and witnessed something very different than my mind had conjured.  This process went on for three days almost always through the night and in places well scouted, researched and in any kind of weather except high winds.  At the end of 4 days over 200+ does on that 10,000 acre property were dead.  The Predator and his teams were extremely well compensated, spent their down time in well appointed hotels, ate like kings and then they packed up their $5,000 custom rifles and moved on to the next “job”.

What happened to the 200+ does shot on that property?  The dead deer were collected by farm hands using what seemed like an Army of four wheelers, heaped them up on flat bed hay wagons at centralized locations on the property, a big hole was excavated in the ground and they were pushed into the hole with a bull dozer and covered up.  No gutting, no venison donation, no nothing. 

I can see inside your heads right now.  You’re wondering “What the?!”  He’s making this up.  No, I’m not making it up.  If I hadn’t just seen trophy deer management at its pinnacle of wealthy perfection I wouldn’t have believed it either.  I learned that there are people out there, extremely wealthy people who want what they want and aren’t afraid to spend the big money to get what they want.  This landowner wanted to speed up the process of correcting his herd ratio by hiring the Predator and his company to get a certain result quickly and that they did!  I didn’t get to interview or speak with the landowner personally but I learned from the Predator that he spent over $600,000 buying genetically superior “buck stock” from deer farms and then introduced these animals onto his property to spread the genetics.

If I could mention the Predators name you would be shocked.  90% of you would know the name instantly and be utterly amazed at the secret and separate lives he lives.  One minute he’s on hunting shows we all watch, the next he’s appearing at trade shows and then we see his face in print ads endorsing hunting products.  What many will never know is the Predator is the ultimate predator in that he owns a company specializing in the mass execution of deer on scales none of us can possibly conceive.  His business is booked through 2012 and is international in scope.

Remember this from the first part? “My belief is man is a predator.  Man has always been a predator and always will be.  We can dress it up and say we’re hunters.  We can use words like “harvest” and “cull” but what we are is killers.  We are predators just as surely as a coyote or a wolf.  We live in modern villages and we talk all about political correctness and heady topics like Democrat vs. Republican, global warming  and world economies but when get geared up and go into their zone something happens to our brains that is a base human instinct we haven’t completely left behind.  We head out to kill.” 

Long pause …. “And when we do kill we have to depersonalize what we’re doing.   A predator doesn’t rationalize and if we did, at the moment of truth nothing would get killed.  Face it.  None of us really needs that meat to survive like primitive man so why do we hunt if not to satisfy an ancient predatory instinct not extinguished?”

So, I ask … If you could buy venison tenderloin in your local supermarket meat counter would you give up hunting?

 

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Numa Optics In Iraq
Thursday, December 10th, 2009

As most of you know, we here at Heritage Hunters are big fans of Numa Optics Sunglasses because of the style and protection that they offer.  But don’t take our word for it, take the word of our Servicemen in Iraq.  Here’s a look at some of the emails that Numa has been receiving from our brave men and women overseas.

Email #1: Dear Numa,

I hope this email finds you and your loved ones in perfect health!!!

I don’t know how the pictures came out on your email, but the one that has the guys with guns walking one of our wounded are my teammates. The red liquid that looks like Coolaid on the floor is actually blood from the 135+ dead.

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I am thankful that I was wearing my Point Ballistic Numas at the time. The debris came from all over the place, no matter where one was standing. It was horrible. My hearing is somewhat gone, my insides still hurt – but my eyes are intact, and that is a good day for me.

After talking to some of my friends, they mentioned that the shades they were wearing did not do the job at staying on their face, or taking the hit from various objects before breaking. My shades stayed on my face even when I was thrown a few feet back, and the lenses only took some mean scratches but did not break… WOW!!!!!  
As a result, three of my teammates asked me to get them the same shades I have with black, clear, and amber lenses.

I thought you might want to hear about this little incident, and take all the credit that you deserve for the great product you represent. As long as I live, I will tell this story to my family and the guys at work. Thank you Jake for saving my eyes!!!!

note: I’m starting to see more and more of your product around here. That makes me very happy…

You can Google “MOFA Bombing in Baghdad” there are several articles about the incident. When you Google it, click images so that you can see some crazy pictures.

Jake, you can rest assured that your product took a very hard, real life, test, and they passed!!!!!    You can now call them anti-terrorist bombing shades… hahaha 

As I told you before, people don’t realize what they have until either that something or somebody is lost, or until you put yourself and your gear through the extreme. Jake, I have to say I am down to 8 lives now and walked away from this terrorist attack with my shades on my face.

Email #2: To: Numa Product Development Team
I use my Numa Sport Optics Ballistic Series sunglasses in Iraq, one of the harshest environments on earth. From the moment I started using them I noticed the lenses maximized clarity in any light condition. I like that the ballistic lenses not only offer performance but impact protection as well. Due to the engineering of the frames the glasses fit tightly to my face which is required in a country where at a moments notice the air can fill with sand. Nothing can ruin your day like eyes full of irritating sand. Thanks for a great product.
B.D.
Triple Canopy

Email #3: Dear Numa,  My name is C.D. and I currently work as a sniper for Triple Canopy in Baghdad. In my 4 years in Iraq I have worn many different brands of sunglasses and I have been wearing these sunglasses for a few weeks now. I can honestly say they are one of the best I have worn here.
In this environment and in the job I perform I need 3 things from my sunglasses:  good optics, good fit, and something that holds up in a gritty sandy environment. I was impressed by the fact that even though they fit snuggly on my face, the lenses don’t get streaked with sweat and they don’t fog up. They are tough as well, I have dropped them a few times and the lenses didn’t scratch. I will wear these till they wear out and I need to buy a new pair.

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“Point” Ballistic Series Sunglasses from Numa Optics

Email #4: Dear Numa, Your Numa X-Frames are much better than the Oakley products floating around here.  Furthermore, I own a pair of Serengeti sun glasses and your polarized lenses are on par with theirs. If you could see what you sun glasses have endured. I left them on top of my Humvee that was traveling 40mph. My buddy saw them fly off my vehicle, stopped and picked them up. Only cosmetic damage to the frames.  The lenses are still great. 
Sgt. C.F.
The United States Marine Corps
Al Anbar, Iraq

Email #5: Dear Numa, My name is Staff Sergeant R. B.  and I am a infantry squad leader with the Army’s 10th Mountain Division.  I have used your glasses for the last months and I could not be happier with their performance.  They provide great eye protection without being overly large or bulky. My unit is set to deploy in the next couple months and I plan on wearing your glasses in Afghanistan. 

All of us here at Heritage Hunters would like to wish our Servicemen and Women Happy Holiday wishes and safety in all areas of deployment.  We thank you for your service and pray for your safe return home.  God Bless!

Outfitter Tuff Camo
Thursday, December 3rd, 2009

Review of Outfitter Tuff Camo (AKA: Trebark)

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The Nostalgia of the Pattern:
Growing up in Central New York, my camouflage clothing consisted of two choices; Military “Woodland” camo and Jim Crumley’s original Trebark pattern.  You may have a similar memory of this pattern that seemed to sweep the country back in the 1980’s. I remember one particular Trebark garment that I wore regularly.  It was a pair of fleece pants that were ultra warm and I always thought they were perfect for making my lower body disappear in the particular tree I parked myself in throughout bow season.  Although those pants have since gone into the great unknown, Trebark remains one of my all time favorite patterns (a relative tie with Mossy Oak’s “Forest Floor”)  I never really thought much about the origin of the Trebark pattern until later in my hunting career when I ran across Jim Crumley’s book Secrets of Bowhunting Deer.  That book, which I highly recommend, recounts the history of Jim’s work with camouflage and the origin of Trebark.  Fascinating stuff if you’re a bowhunter.  I remember thinking during my reading of this book that I haven’t seen much Trebark related products on the shelves at my local sporting goods stores.  The other two mainstream camo companies (and I’m sure you can figure out who they are) had pretty much cornered the market in the Northeast.   I liked the Trebark pattern because it had that vertical representation found on actual trees, but couldn’t find it anywhere.  

Jim Crumley:
Trebark was invented by a man named Jim Crumley.  I ran into Mr. Crumley at a Sportsman’s Show in Virginia a few years back and was ecstatic to find out that he is still producing the original Trebark pattern along with 2 new patterns (Trebark 005 and Outfitter Tuff camo).  During our conversation, I remember telling him that I had not seen the Original Trebark pattern on the shelves in NY recently and he referred me to his website, which is how he does most of his business these days.  The name is now Outfitter Tuff but all three patterns are available on the site www.outfittertuff.com

Many think that camouflage patterns are all the same, with small exceptions.  Trebark and Outfitter Tuff camouflage however have a vertical base that mimics the natural lines found in the timber.  It is this characteristic that sets these patterns on a new level and one you may want to investigate for yourself.  In fact, there is a great video on Jim’s site explaining how the Trebark pattern got its start….Click here to see it!

Here’s a look at the 3 types of camo on Jim’s site

Original Trebark:  Chamois Pants ($39.99) Chamois Shirt ($39.99)

If you read the opening paragraph, you know how fond I am of the original Trebark pattern.  I honestly think this pattern may be the single best pattern for treestand hunting in that the pattern is vertical, you know, like a tree!  Aside from my affinity to this pattern, the chamois shirt and pants that we tested are extremely rugged and built to withstand the punishment of many bow seasons.  I also liked how the color lightened up a bit with successive washings.  This makes you less likely to appear like a darkk blob up in a tree.  So I guess the fact that fading may occur is a good thing in this case.

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Trebark 005:  Chamois Pants ($39.99)  Chamois Shirt ($39.99)

This pattern appears to be more of a digital representation of the original.  While the colors of browns, blacks and grays are separated with clear boundary lines in the original pattern, the Trebark 005 pattern boundaries seem to blend together better and appears more like a digital representation of the actual bark of a tree. The gray in this pattern appears a little darker than the gray in the Original pattern in my opinion.  Never the less, this updated version of the original pattern is offered in the same rugged material and lightens up with washing.  Remember, we think that’s a good thing in this case!

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Outfitter Tuff:  Nylon Pants ($29.99) Nylon Shirt ($24.99)

The pattern that bears a new name and logo for Mr. Crumley is visibly different from the Trebark patterns. It has a base similar to the new Trebark 005 pattern but with brown and green leaf overlays.  We particularly like the brown rust color of the leaves since it’s a great representation of that Fall color we all know and love.  As I mentioned in my opening paragraph, my two favorite camo patterns have always been the Original Trebark and Mossy Oak’s Forest Floor.  This pattern appears to combine both elements of both bark and leaf patterns.  Bravo Mr. Crumley!

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Long Sleeve T-shirts:  ($19.99)

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Outfitter Tuff offers a performance style long sleeve T-shirt in the two Trebark patterns.  We absolutely loved these for scouting and treestand work!  Think of the same material found in those loose fitting Under Armour / moisture wicking type shirts but with the Trebark pattern on them, and for half the price!

All three of these patterns are available in chamois and nylon as well as insulated versions of the jackets.  The material and stitching are rugged and held up well after heavy use and washing.  We found the “Tuff” in the new Outfitter Tuff name to be accurate!

Our Marks on Jim Crumley’s Outfitter Tuff Camo

Quality: 5 out of 5: The 9.0 Ounce 100% cotton chamois material is not only rugged, but extremely quiet and does not shrink when washed.

Fit: 5 out of 5: We found the Outfitter Tuff products to be very true to size.  We usually have to settle for XL pants even though we would consider ourselves a Large.  Since the Outfitter Tuff website provides a size chart for each garment, we ordered a Large waist size and the pants fit perfect!

Overall Value: 5 out of 5:  It’s hard to beat the combination of quality and price with the Outfitter Tuff products.  We really like the fact that the website includes a sizing chart with each product so you can decide which size is right for you.  Also, the fact that the pattern is offered in a variety of materials depending on your typical hunting climate is a bonus as well.

Selection: 4 out of 5: Personally, we’d like to see these patterns offerred in bibs, fleece and more insulated type apparel to give a solid 5 out of 5.  Regardless, we’re glad to find that the original Trebark pattern is still alive and kicking and that it has new members to the family!

For more information and products in the Outfitter Tuff line, please visit www.outfittertuff.com

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